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  • A three-dimensional model of methionine is superimposed on a phase contrast micrograph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from a log phase culture.

    Follow the Sulfur: Using Yeast Mutants to Study a Metabolic Pathway

    Learning Objectives
    At the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
    • use spot plating techniques to compare the growth of yeast strains on solid culture media.
    • predict the ability of specific met deletion strains to grow on media containing various sulfur sources.
    • predict how mutations in specific genes will affect the concentrations of metabolites in the pathways involved in methionine biosynthesis.
  • Figure 2. ICB-Students come to class prepared to discuss the text
  • Simplified Representation of the Global Carbon Cycle, https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/CarbonCycle/images/carbon_cycle.jpg

    Promoting Climate Change Literacy for Non-majors: Implementation of an atmospheric carbon dioxide modeling activity as...

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to manipulate and produce data and graphs.
    • Students will be able to design a simple mathematical model of atmospheric CO2 that can be used to make predictions.
    • Students will be able to conduct simulations, analyze, interpret, and draw conclusions about atmospheric CO2 levels from their own computer generated simulated data.
     
  • Graphic of structured decision making process

    Using Structured Decision Making to Explore Complex Environmental Issues

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    1. Describe the process, challenges, and benefits of structured decision making for natural resource management decisions.
    2. Explain and reflect on the role of science and scientists in structured decision making and how those roles interact and compare to the roles of other stakeholders.
    3. Assess scientific evidence for a given management or policy action to resolve an environmental issue.
  • Ecosystem

    Using Pathway Maps to Link Concepts, Peer Review, Primary Literature Searches and Data Assessment in Large Enrollment...

    Learning Objectives
    • Define basic concepts and terminology of Ecosystem Ecology
    • Link biological processes that affect each other
    • Evaluate whether the link causes a positive, negative, or neutral effect
    • Find primary literature
    • Identify data that correctly supports or refutes an hypothesis
  • 3D Print Models: A collection of 3D models printed from online repository files.
  • How Silly Putty® is like bone

    What do Bone and Silly Putty® have in Common?: A Lesson on Bone Viscoelasticity

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to explain how the anatomical structure of long bones relates to their function.
    • Students will be able to define viscoelasticity, hysteresis, anisotropy, stiffness, strength, ductility, and toughness.
    • Students will be able to identify the elastic and plastic regions of a stress-strain curve. They will be able to correlate each phase of the stress-strain curve with physical changes to bone.
    • Students will be able to predict how a bone would respond to changes in the magnitude of an applied force, and to variations in the speed or angle at which a force is applied.
    • Students will be able to determine the reason(s) why bone injuries occur more frequently during athletic events than during normal everyday use.
  • Plant ecology students surveying vegetation at Red Hills, CA, spring 2012.  From left to right are G.L, F.D, A.M., and R.P.  Photo used with permission from all students.

    Out of Your Seat and on Your Feet! An adaptable course-based research project in plant ecology for advanced students

    Learning Objectives
    Students will:
    • Articulate testable hypotheses. (Lab 8, final presentation/paper, in-class exercises)
    • Analyze data to determine the level of support for articulated hypotheses. (Labs 4-7, final presentation/paper)
    • Identify multiple species of plants in the field quickly and accurately. (Labs 2-3, field trip)
    • Measure environmental variables and sample vegetation in the field. (Labs 2-3, field trip)
    • Analyze soil samples using a variety of low-tech lab techniques. (Open labs after field trip)
    • Use multiple statistical techniques to analyze data for patterns. (Labs 4-8, final presentation/paper)
    • Interpret statistical analyses to distinguish between strong and weak interactions in a biological system. (Labs 4-7, final presentation/paper)
    • Develop and present a conference-style presentation in a public forum. (Lab 8, final presentation/paper)
    • Write a publication-ready research paper communicating findings and displaying data. (Lab 8, final presentation/paper)
  • This collage contains original images taken by the course instructor. The images show a microscopic view of stomata on the underside of a Brassica rapa leaf (A), B. rapa plants in their growth trays (B), a flowering B. rapa plant (C), and different concentrations of foliar protein (D). Photos edited via Microsoft Windows Photo Editor and Phototastic Collage Maker.

    A flexible, multi-week approach to plant biology - How will plants respond to higher levels of CO2?

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Apply findings from each week's lesson to make predictions and informed hypotheses about the next week's lesson.
    • Keep a detailed laboratory notebook.
    • Write and peer-edit the sections of a scientific paper, and collaboratively write an entire lab report in the form of a scientific research paper.
    • Search for, find, and read scientific research papers.
    • Work together as a team to conduct experiments.
    • Connect findings and ideas from each week's lesson to get a broader understanding of how plants will respond to higher levels of CO2 (e.g., stomatal density, photosynthetic/respiratory rates, foliar protein concentrations, growth, and resource allocation).
    Note: Additional, more specific objectives are included with each of the four lessons (Supporting Files S1-S4)
  • Students present their posters to classmates and instructors during a poster fair.

    Discovery Poster Project

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • identify and learn about a scientific research discovery of interest to them using popular press articles and the primary literature
    • find a group on campus doing research that aligns with their interests and communicate with the faculty leader of that group
    • create and present a poster that synthesizes their knowledge of the research beyond the discovery
  • The mechanisms regulating the cellular respiration system.

    Discovering Cellular Respiration with Computational Modeling and Simulations

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Describe how changes in cellular homeostasis affect metabolic intermediates.
    • Perturb and interpret a simulation of cellular respiration.
    • Describe cellular mechanisms regulating cellular respiration.
    • Describe how glucose, oxygen, and coenzymes affect cellular respiration.
    • Describe the interconnectedness of cellular respiration.
    • Identify and describe the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration, glycolysis, pyruvate processing, citric acid cycle, and the electron transport chain.
    • Describe how different energy sources are used in cellular respiration.
    • Trace carbon through cellular respiration from glucose to carbon dioxide.
  • Arabidopsis Seedling

    Linking Genotype to Phenotype: The Effect of a Mutation in Gibberellic Acid Production on Plant Germination

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • identify when germination occurs.
    • score germination in the presence and absence of GA to construct graphs of collated class data of wild-type and mutant specimens.
    • identify the genotype of an unknown sample based on the analysis of their graphical data.
    • organize data and perform quantitative data analysis.
    • explain the importance of GA for plant germination.
    • connect the inheritance of a mutation with the observed phenotype.
  • 	http://biocyc.org/META/NEW-IMAGE?type=PATHWAY&object=TCA. Image adapted from :Image:Citric acid cycle noi.svg| (uploaded to Commons by wadester16)

    A simple way for students to visualize cellular respiration: adapting the board game MousetrapTM to model complexity

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to describe the three stages of cellular respiration.
    • Students will be able to identify the reactants entering and the products formed during each stage of cellular respiration.
    • Students will be able to explain how chemical energy in carbohydrates is transferred to ATP through the stages of cellular respiration.
    • Students will be able to explain the effects of compartmentalization of cellular respiration reactions in different cellular spaces.
    • Students will be able to predict biological outcomes when a specific stage(s) of cellular respiration is altered. 
  • Using Place-Based Economically Relevant Organisms to Improve Student Understanding of the Roles of Carbon Dioxide,...

    Learning Objectives
    At the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
    • Describe the roles of light energy and carbon dioxide in photosynthetic organisms.
    • Identify the effect of nutrients on the growth of photosynthetic organisms.
    • Describe global cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and how they relate to photosynthetic organisms.
  • Evaluating the Quick Fix: Weight Loss Drugs and Cellular Respiration Image File: QuickFixPrimImage.tiff Sources for images: Balance: Public Domain CCO http://www.pd4pic.com/scales-justice-scale-libra-balance-weighbridge.html Mitochondria: https://thumb7.shutterstock.com/thumb_large/1503584/235472731/stock-vector-mitochondrion-235472731.jpg Pills: https://pixabay.com/static/uploads/photo/2014/07/05/15/16/pills-384846_960_720.jpg

    Evaluating the Quick Fix: Weight Loss Drugs and Cellular Respiration

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to explain how the energy from sugars is transformed into ATP via cellular respiration.
    • Students will be able to predict an outcome if there is a perturbation in the cellular respiration pathway.
    • Students will be able to state and evaluate a hypothesis.
    • Students will be able to interpret data from a graph, and use that data to make inferences about the action of a drug.
  • Modeling the Research Process: Authentic human physiology research in a large non-majors course

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Read current scientific literature
    • Formulate testable hypotheses
    • Design an experimental procedure to test their hypothesis
    • Make scientific observations
    • Analyze and interpret data
    • Communicate results visually and orally
  • Double-stranded, supercoiled yarn. Intertwined, supercoiled, and double-stranded yarn, representing chromosomal template DNA, with a section marked with black stripes to represent the DNA fragment for modeling PCR fundamentals.

    A Kinesthetic Modeling Activity to Teach PCR Fundamentals

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Draw or model the first three cycles of PCR, including the correct directionality (5’- and 3’-ends) of the primers and single-stranded PCR products.
    • Diagram how single-stranded products from the first cycle of PCR are used as templates for subsequent PCR cycles.
    • Demonstrate which parts of the primers will anneal to the original DNA template and subsequent PCR products.
    • Model and demonstrate when the primer restriction enzyme sites are incorporated into double-stranded PCR products.
    • Calculate the number of desired-length PCR products and long PCR products for each amplification cycle.
    • Demonstrate how the incorporation of primer restriction enzyme sites into PCR products is a useful tool for subsequent cloning of the product into a vector.