Skip to main content

You are here

Filters

Search found 5 items

Search

  • Double-stranded, supercoiled yarn. Intertwined, supercoiled, and double-stranded yarn, representing chromosomal template DNA, with a section marked with black stripes to represent the DNA fragment for modeling PCR fundamentals.

    A Kinesthetic Modeling Activity to Teach PCR Fundamentals

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Draw or model the first three cycles of PCR, including the correct directionality (5’- and 3’-ends) of the primers and single-stranded PCR products.
    • Diagram how single-stranded products from the first cycle of PCR are used as templates for subsequent PCR cycles.
    • Demonstrate which parts of the primers will anneal to the original DNA template and subsequent PCR products.
    • Model and demonstrate when the primer restriction enzyme sites are incorporated into double-stranded PCR products.
    • Calculate the number of desired-length PCR products and long PCR products for each amplification cycle.
    • Demonstrate how the incorporation of primer restriction enzyme sites into PCR products is a useful tool for subsequent cloning of the product into a vector.
  • A schematic of the relationship between the different types of pasta or beans and the respective gut and environmental bacteria

    The impact of diet and antibiotics on the gut microbiome

    Learning Objectives
    After completing the exercise, students will be able to:
    • Identify several of the nine phyla that contribute to the gut microbiome and name the two predominant ones;
    • Describe how diet impacts the gut microbiome and compare the composition of the gut microbiome between different diets;
    • Describe how antibiotic treatment impacts the gut microbiome and understand how this leads to infection, for example by Clostridium difficile;
    • Trace the response to a change in diet, starting with i) changes in the composition of the microbiome, followed by ii) changes in the bacterial metabolic pathways and the respective excreted metabolic products, resulting in iii) a molecular response in the host intestinal cells, and eventually iv) resulting in human disease;
    • Improve their ability to read scientific literature;
    • Express themselves orally and in writing;
    • Develop team working skill
  • Simplified Representation of the Global Carbon Cycle, https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/CarbonCycle/images/carbon_cycle.jpg

    Promoting Climate Change Literacy for Non-majors: Implementation of an atmospheric carbon dioxide modeling activity as...

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to manipulate and produce data and graphs.
    • Students will be able to design a simple mathematical model of atmospheric CO2 that can be used to make predictions.
    • Students will be able to conduct simulations, analyze, interpret, and draw conclusions about atmospheric CO2 levels from their own computer generated simulated data.
     
  • 	http://biocyc.org/META/NEW-IMAGE?type=PATHWAY&object=TCA. Image adapted from :Image:Citric acid cycle noi.svg| (uploaded to Commons by wadester16)

    A simple way for students to visualize cellular respiration: adapting the board game MousetrapTM to model complexity

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to describe the three stages of cellular respiration.
    • Students will be able to identify the reactants entering and the products formed during each stage of cellular respiration.
    • Students will be able to explain how chemical energy in carbohydrates is transferred to ATP through the stages of cellular respiration.
    • Students will be able to explain the effects of compartmentalization of cellular respiration reactions in different cellular spaces.
    • Students will be able to predict biological outcomes when a specific stage(s) of cellular respiration is altered. 
  • The mechanisms regulating the cellular respiration system.

    Discovering Cellular Respiration with Computational Modeling and Simulations

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Describe how changes in cellular homeostasis affect metabolic intermediates.
    • Perturb and interpret a simulation of cellular respiration.
    • Describe cellular mechanisms regulating cellular respiration.
    • Describe how glucose, oxygen, and coenzymes affect cellular respiration.
    • Describe the interconnectedness of cellular respiration.
    • Identify and describe the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration, glycolysis, pyruvate processing, citric acid cycle, and the electron transport chain.
    • Describe how different energy sources are used in cellular respiration.
    • Trace carbon through cellular respiration from glucose to carbon dioxide.