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  • Cold-blooded animals and chemical kinetics

    Teaching the Biological Relevance of Chemical Kinetics Using Cold-Blooded Animal Biology

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Predict the effect of reaction temperature on the rate of a chemical reaction
    • Interpret a graph plotted between rate of a chemical reaction and temperature
    • Discuss chemical kinetics utilizing case studies of cold-blooded animals
  • Simplified Representation of the Global Carbon Cycle, https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/CarbonCycle/images/carbon_cycle.jpg

    Promoting Climate Change Literacy for Non-majors: Implementation of an atmospheric carbon dioxide modeling activity as...

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to manipulate and produce data and graphs.
    • Students will be able to design a simple mathematical model of atmospheric CO2 that can be used to make predictions.
    • Students will be able to conduct simulations, analyze, interpret, and draw conclusions about atmospheric CO2 levels from their own computer generated simulated data.
     
  • A schematic of the relationship between the different types of pasta or beans and the respective gut and environmental bacteria

    The impact of diet and antibiotics on the gut microbiome

    Learning Objectives
    After completing the exercise, students will be able to:
    • Identify several of the nine phyla that contribute to the gut microbiome and name the two predominant ones;
    • Describe how diet impacts the gut microbiome and compare the composition of the gut microbiome between different diets;
    • Describe how antibiotic treatment impacts the gut microbiome and understand how this leads to infection, for example by Clostridium difficile;
    • Trace the response to a change in diet, starting with i) changes in the composition of the microbiome, followed by ii) changes in the bacterial metabolic pathways and the respective excreted metabolic products, resulting in iii) a molecular response in the host intestinal cells, and eventually iv) resulting in human disease;
    • Improve their ability to read scientific literature;
    • Express themselves orally and in writing;
    • Develop team working skill
  • SNP model by David Eccles (gringer) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

    Exploration of the Human Genome by Investigation of Personalized SNPs

    Learning Objectives
    Students successfully completing this lesson will be able to:
    • Effectively use the bioinformatics databases (SNPedia, the UCSC Genome Browser, and NCBI) to explore SNPs of interest within the human genome.
    • Identify three health-related SNPs of personal interest and use the UCSC Genome Browser to define their precise chromosomal locations and determine whether they lie within a gene or are intergenic.
    • Establish a list of all genome-wide association studies correlated with a particular health-related SNP.
    • Predict which model organism would be most appropriate for conducting further research on a human disease.
  • blind cave fish
  • The mechanisms regulating the cellular respiration system.

    Discovering Cellular Respiration with Computational Modeling and Simulations

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Describe how changes in cellular homeostasis affect metabolic intermediates.
    • Perturb and interpret a simulation of cellular respiration.
    • Describe cellular mechanisms regulating cellular respiration.
    • Describe how glucose, oxygen, and coenzymes affect cellular respiration.
    • Describe the interconnectedness of cellular respiration.
    • Identify and describe the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration, glycolysis, pyruvate processing, citric acid cycle, and the electron transport chain.
    • Describe how different energy sources are used in cellular respiration.
    • Trace carbon through cellular respiration from glucose to carbon dioxide.
  • Sodium-Potassium pump

    Lights, Camera, Acting Transport! Using role-play to teach membrane transport

    Learning Objectives
    At the end of this activity, students should be able to:
    • Compare and contrast the mechanisms of simple diffusion, facilitated diffusion, and active transport (both primary and secondary).
    • Identify, and provide a rationale for, the mechanism(s) by which various substances cross the plasma membrane.
    • Describe the steps involved in the transport of ions by the Na+/K+ pump, and explain the importance of electrogenic pumps to the generation and maintenance of membrane potentials.
    • Explain the function of electrochemical gradients as potential energy sources specifically used in secondary active transport.
    • Relate each molecule or ion transported by the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) to its own concentration or electrochemical gradient, and describe which molecules travel with and against these gradients.
  • Using the Cell Engineer/Detective Approach to Explore Cell Structure and Function

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Identify the major cell organelles
    • List the major functions of the organelles
    • Predict how changes in organelle/cell structure could alter cellular function
    • Explain how overall cellular function is dependent upon organelles/cell structure
    • Relate cell structure to everyday contexts
  • Confocal microscope image of a mouse egg that is arrested at metaphase of meiosis II. Green, tubulin staining of meiotic spindle; red, actin staining of egg membrane; blue, DNA. This image was obtained on a Zeiss 510 Meta confocal microscope in the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University

    Sex-specific differences in Meiosis: Real-world applications

    Learning Objectives
    After completion of the lesson students will be able to:
    1. Describe the differences between female and male meiosis.
    2. Interpret graphical data to make decisions relevant to medical practices.
    3. Develop a hypothesis that explains the difference in incidence of aneuploidy in gametes between males and females.