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  • Newspapers for a rainy day, filled with reports of the ways that science and society are interwoven. ©Eleanor Vandegrift

    Building student literacy and metacognition through reading science in the news

    Learning Objectives
    For each specific topic (stem cells and cloning, genetically modified organisms, and the human genome and human genetic diseases), students will be able to:
    • describe the underlying biology and explore how scientific reasoning and methods develop this understanding,
    • discuss the types of policy decisions that regulate studies related to biology or its application to human or environmental health,
    • evaluate scientific information to distinguish reliable information from propaganda,
    • explain how scientific controversies can arise when the same scientific questions are approached in different ways,
    • explore why some types of biological issues trigger regulatory decisions that can affect both research that would deepen our understanding of the issue and application of the results to policy decisions,
    • write about scientists who are researching topics related to our course, and
    • read science writing published in popular media sources.
  • A student playing the Cell Pictionary® portion of this lesson.

    Teaching Cell Structures through Games

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will identify cell structures when viewing an image or diagram of a cell.
    • Students will define the function of eukaryotic organelles and structures, including describing the processes and conditions related to transmembrane transport
    • Students will differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, plant and animal cells according to their structural organization.
  • An active-learning lesson that targets student understanding of population growth in ecology

    Learning Objectives
    Students will be able to:
    • Calculate and compare population density and abundance.
    • Identify whether a growth curve describes exponential, linear, and/or logistic growth.
    • Describe and calculate a population's growth rate using linear, exponential, and logistic models.
    • Explain the influence of carrying capacity and population density on growth rate.
  • “Quantifying variation in biodiversity” Groundhogs (Marmota monax) with conspicuous variation awaiting measurements.

    Teaching Biodiversity with Museum Specimens in an Inquiry-Based Lab

    Learning Objectives
    Students completing this lab module will:
    • Learn how to appropriately handle and measure museum specimens.
    • Develop the necessary statistical skills to analyze museum specimen data.
    • Become familiar with how to search an online museum database and integrate supplemental data with their own dataset.
    • Strengthen scientific communication skills by presenting research to their peers.
    • Demonstrate ability to investigate scientific questions and address obstacles that occur during data collection and integration.
    • Increase proficiency in managing and using large datasets for scientific research.
    • Make connections between natural history knowledge and morphology of organisms in developing and testing hypotheses.
  • Using Place-Based Economically Relevant Organisms to Improve Student Understanding of the Roles of Carbon Dioxide,...

    Learning Objectives
    At the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
    • Describe the roles of light energy and carbon dioxide in photosynthetic organisms.
    • Identify the effect of nutrients on the growth of photosynthetic organisms.
    • Describe global cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and how they relate to photosynthetic organisms.