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  • A pair of homologous chromosomes.

    Meiosis: A Play in Three Acts, Starring DNA Sequence

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to identify sister chromatids and homologous chromosomes at different stages of meiosis.
    • Students will be able to identify haploid and diploid cells, whether or not the chromosomes are replicated.
    • Students will be able to explain why homologous chromosomes must pair during meiosis.
    • Students will be able to relate DNA sequence similarity to chromosomal structures.
    • Students will be able to identify crossing over as the key to proper pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis.
    • Students will be able to predict the outcomes of meiosis for a particular individual or cell.
  • Model skeleton

    Plotting Cranial and Spinal Nerve Pathways in a Human Anatomy Lab

    Learning Objectives
    • Identify and describe the functions of cranial and spinal nerves
    • Identify cranial and spinal nerve origination points and what structures they innervate
    • Trace the routes that cranial and spinal nerves take throughout the body
  • 3D Print Model of the Mars Curiosity Rover, printed from NASA 3D Resources (https://nasa3d.arc.nasa.gov/detail/mars-rover-curiosity)

    Exploring the March to Mars Using 3D Print Models

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to describe the major aspects of the Mars Curiosity Rover missions.
    • Students will be able to synthesize information learned from a classroom jigsaw activity on the Mars Curiosity Rover missions.
    • Students will be able to work in teams to plan a future manned mission to Mars.
    • Students will be able to summarize their reports to the class.
  • A tuco-tuco in South America (photo credit: Jeremy Hsu)

    Furry with a chance of evolution: Exploring genetic drift with tuco-tucos

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to explain how genetic drift leads to allelic changes over generations.
    • Students will be able to demonstrate that sampling error can affect every generation, which can result in random changes in allelic frequency.
    • Students will be able to explore and evaluate the effect of population size on the strength of genetic drift.
    • Students will be able to analyze quantitative data associated with genetic drift.
  • Students engaged in building the PCR model

    A Close-Up Look at PCR

    Learning Objectives
    At the end of this lesson students will be able to...
    • Describe the role of a primer in PCR
    • Predict sequence and length of PCR product based on primer sequences
    • Recognize that primers are incorporated into the final PCR products and explain why
    • Identify covalent and hydrogen bonds formed and broken during PCR
    • Predict the structure of PCR products after each cycle of the reaction
    • Explain why amplification proceeds exponentially
  • Multiple sequence alignment of homologous cytochrome C protein sequences using Jalview viewer.

    Sequence Similarity: An inquiry based and "under the hood" approach for incorporating molecular sequence...

    Learning Objectives
    At the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
    • Define similarity in a non-biological and biological sense when provided with two strings of letters.
    • Quantify the similarity between two gene/protein sequences.
    • Explain how a substitution matrix is used to quantify similarity.
    • Calculate amino acid similarity scores using a scoring matrix.
    • Demonstrate how to access genomic data (e.g., from NCBI nucleotide and protein databases).
    • Demonstrate how to use bioinformatics tools to analyze genomic data (e.g., BLASTP), explain a simplified BLAST search algorithm including how similarity is used to perform a BLAST search, and how to evaluate the results of a BLAST search.
    • Create a nearest-neighbor distance matrix.
    • Create a multiple sequence alignment using a nearest-neighbor distance matrix and a phylogram based on similarity of amino acid sequences.
    • Use appropriate bioinformatics sequence alignment tools to investigate a biological question.
  • How Silly Putty® is like bone

    What do Bone and Silly Putty® have in Common?: A Lesson on Bone Viscoelasticity

    Learning Objectives
    • Students will be able to explain how the anatomical structure of long bones relates to their function.
    • Students will be able to define viscoelasticity, hysteresis, anisotropy, stiffness, strength, ductility, and toughness.
    • Students will be able to identify the elastic and plastic regions of a stress-strain curve. They will be able to correlate each phase of the stress-strain curve with physical changes to bone.
    • Students will be able to predict how a bone would respond to changes in the magnitude of an applied force, and to variations in the speed or angle at which a force is applied.
    • Students will be able to determine the reason(s) why bone injuries occur more frequently during athletic events than during normal everyday use.